Thursday Doors, 23/8/18: Trieste

The end of the world, the ocean, the countries, the history. Or the beginning, you be the judge. Doors don’t mind, they lead into both directions.

Trieste in Italy next to Slovenia at the end of the Adriatic Sea is a rather peculiar destination. Some have called it melancholy, industrial, ugly. For me it’s a place where we used to buy cheap jeans, coffee and chewing gum back in Yugoslavia and boarded the ferry for Greece. Lately it’s a place where visitors hop on the train to reach us in the south of Tuscany by way of Orvieto.

And yet I have never been to its old streets, or at least not with my camera. That’s why I was glad when father found out there was a regular boat line between Piran and Trieste and invited me on a day trip. After some initial suspicion (see my first Trieste post here) we reached Trieste in about 30 minutes and spent a lovely if hot day in the city where James Joyce spent more than 15 years.

More doors that JJ used to open in my second post from here at a later date, today the initial mix of consufing historical impressions and door scenes.

For Norm Frampton’s Thursday Doors challenge.

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41 thoughts on “Thursday Doors, 23/8/18: Trieste

  1. If I wouldn’t have read your text, I would have said it’s a beautiful city. And you took wonderful captures! Love the last door – romantic. Now I wonder why they think industrial is ugly … The free territory …USA and UK come back …is that from the iron curtain period?

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    1. Oh Junieper, it is gorgeous but it has a complicated history and some truly atrocious industrial sectors. There is something in the air. Makes one burst out in art. 😉 (Don’t ask me any specifics about history, though. I was not a stellar student.)

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  2. I loved your intro. Your comments always amuse me, too. 🙂 I always thought the name Trieste had a romantic ring to it, but despite being close several times, I’ve never really seriously entertained the idea of visiting … not for any concrete reason, just never quite made it there … nor tried very hard. Thanks for going for me!

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    1. Thank you, Lexi, that’s what we do, don’t we? Travel to places for all the others who cannot. At least for the time being. But one never knows when one will hop to Madagascar, does one? 😉 It was so great to read your post! ❤ As for Trieste, don't worry. It doesn't look like much will change soon. It's waiting for you as is.

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  3. I noticed the statues in front of the bank as well and can’t help but scratch my head wondering what they represent.
    Overall the place does have an industrial feel, but perhaps that’s the impression I’m left with because of the lighting in these shots?

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    1. Thanks, Norm. These photos are from the start of our visit when the sun was covered by a large cloud. We were happy because it made it less hot but that’s why the photos look like from a strange crime drama. Later the cloud moved on and it was hot and blue again. If you reach the city by car, the industry is plain to see. That bank building? As ugly as what they do inside, I suppose.

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  4. At least, it is worth mentioning that they live in Trieste (in the surrounding villages as well), Slovenes who call the city Trst. On the first occasion, you could take photographs – for example – of the door of the Slovenian Theater, the editorial board of the Primorski dnevnik (Slovene diary) and the Slovenian bookshop.

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  5. Aha!
    Your first paragraph took my breath.
    You know, its all about perspective you choosw whether the glass is half full or half empty.
    The oceans for me are not the end of the world, but rather new beginnings.
    Great photos!

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    1. Thank you, Aditya. It’s always about the perspective indeed. As for the sea, in Trieste the long Adriatic sea comes to its end (or grows out from here), so the water is shallow and warm. Which is where our beginning was, or so some say. 🙂

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  6. That last one is really beautiful, but my favourite is Fiandra (whatever it means / contains).
    At first I was confused why you had two photos of that German Bank, but it made sense when I saw the caption. I had a good laugh too!

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  7. So many great photos and atmosphere, Manja. For some reason, sea gulls can appear so philosophical when they’re not exactly renowned for their intelligence. My favourite door was the last one with its beautiful lace work.
    Best wishes,
    Rowena

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      1. Thanks, Manja. I spent a few hours going through my photos from Tasmania picking out door shots. I wonder if this is one of the first signs of madness…mad door fever?
        Best wishes,
        Rowena

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Manja, I hadn’t thought about Tasmania being so remote and you’re right. You get those great big waves hitting the West coast and they’re coming all the way from South America. That’s mind-blowing.
          I’ve also driven across from Sydney to Perth and the isolation out there is something else too, and so is the vastness of space and there was a real beauty in that. You could spread your wings from horizon to horizon. I’ll have to scan in my photos and do some posts. Not too many doors out that way though.
          Best wishes,
          Rowena

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  8. Wow. Love Fiandra, whatever that is. That’s stunning. Also, I really like the green banners on the one that invites US and UK back.
    The first photo, it’s another one I can’t decide if I prefer the color or the black and white. Lovely.

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