Favourite WPC posts, blog 2/1

This is my second post for the last WPC challenge ever, which challenged us to post our favourite photos. Who follows me will know that it won’t end here.

In my last week’s post my favourite WPC posts from my first blog were gathered. Today I start a look back at my second blog.

I encountered a problem which I often have: I cannot choose. All the unchosen ones give me ugly looks. That’s why today I present the first twenty, while the other Weekly Photo Challenge posts from my previous, second blog will patiently wait for the next time. Or two, or three.

I strongly encourage you to click on the link in the caption and be transported to the post in question. (Not that absolute sense is promised even then.) Enjoy!

It has crystallised that I set up my WPC posts in two ways.

The first gallery shows the instances when the theme fell in my lap just in time for me to showcase a recent trip or event. So I was able to show you my local beach, Talamone before the storm, and Rome as a system of opposites and as a playground for the photographer in her spare time. The dog theme continued with a pooch and the subject of quest(ion) at Slavkov dom above Ljubljana, another posing at the edge of the Kamnik-Savinja Alps in Slovenia, and a nostalgic look at our first dog. Four more Slovenian posts conclude this series: the day when father won our annual garden card tournament, a look at Ljubljana as a bowl of cherries, a transmogrifying (and fully unsponsored) post on pizzeria Marina in Koper, and some of the narrowest views from Piran on the Adriatic coast.

The second group of photos should be viewed together with their sisters in original posts even more, since they were gathered from my entire body of work and huddled under the same umbrella word (in italic) provided by the challenge.

The swans from lake Zbilje represent rare Slovenian sigh(t)s, Lake Bled is in one of the frames used for my photos, while the boat is jubilant because it is the prettiest in Porto Ercole. The curve is represented by the fountain in front of the Typewriter in Rome, and the question on a Roman wall makes me happy that I pay attention to details. The shiny happy group of relatives pose in Piran, whereas us three on Roman pillars advertise chaos that a day walking around Rome causes in your system. The photo for mirror shows an unplanned selfie from the Giardino dei tarocchi, while the last photo is someone looking up rather desperately.

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15 thoughts on “Favourite WPC posts, blog 2/1

    1. Thank you, Sunny Days. 🙂 The fountain is in front of The Altare della Patria also known as the Monumento Nazionale a Vittorio Emanuele II, but I (and some others) call it the Typwriter since it looks like it. 😀 In Rome, of course.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Bojana, I’m glad to see you hopping around my blog. (I’ve read the article on Slovenia. Good but nothing I wouldn’t know already. So the JNA itself decided to turn those planes around rather than let them come and drop the bombs on Slovenia. Or was it just a scare? I thought it was someone from the outside. Such as Vatican.)

      Liked by 1 person

      1. There wasn’t a Serbian minority like in Bosnia and Croatia and therefore of no interest in creating a ‘united Serbian territory.’ Scared, I don’t think so? JNA was the fourth most powerful army in Europe.
        Take a look at these books. You might find the answers here:

        Poslednji dani SFRJ, Borisav Jović

        Između slave i anateme: politička biografija Slobodana Miloševića (1994)

        Lovljenje vetra: politička ispovest Dobrice Ćosića (2001)

        Liked by 2 people

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